5 Inspirational Brand Storytelling Examples To Energize Your Content Marketing

5 Inspirational Brand Storytelling Examples To Energize Your Content Marketing

5-inspirational-brand-storytelling-examples-to-energize-your-content-marketing

Stories are passed down from one generation to the next.

Aesop, the Greek storyteller is credited with some of the best known tales.

Though none of his writings survive, it is the storytelling tradition which continues.

1-moz-for-brand-storytelling-examples

 Image Source: Moz

Today, every company is trying to share their unique story with the world. But I won’t bore you by telling you stuff you’ve heard before.

Instead let’s take a look at 5 inspirational brand storytelling examples, and the ingredients for a great brand story.

1. Beardbrand

2-beardbrand-for-brand-storytelling-examples

Image Source: Beardbrand

Beardbrand as the name suggests is a company selling beard grooming products.

Started in 2012 by Eric Bandholz after he competed in his first Beard & Moustache championship, was initially launched using a YouTube channel and blog. Eric quickly realized that this niche was underserved and he jumped on this opportunity to catch it. While blogging, he was contacted by the NY times for information on beard care products and Eric didn’t miss this chance to promote his brand.

With the result, the ball kept on rolling. Today, Eric’s Beardbrand serves millions of beard men around the world.  What was launched as a blog has now over 100,000 YouTube subscribers and has become a 7 figure business.

Takeaway:

Resonate with your audience, identify their needs. Eric realized what would suit his audience and provided the latest information on his Blog & YouTube channel. He brought together a community of bearded men all around the world. 

2. Johnnie Walker

johnie-walker-for-brand-storytelling-examples

Image Source: Pinterest

Keep walking. That’s what the Johnnie Walker tagline says. The story dates back to 1819 when John was a young lad working at a farm.

Soon the farm was sold and John moved to selling at a grocery shop. With his love for whisky, John blended to produce the best whisky every time and became quite popular.

Though John passed away in 1857, his son Alexander continued his legacy and introduced the square bottle to reduce breakages.

Later, Alexander passed the baton to his sons Alexander II and George. They renamed the popular whisky and hence Johnnie Walker Red label & Johnnie Walker Black label were born.

Today, Johnnie Walker is one of the biggest whisky brands in the world and has the best piece of advice for you, to keep walking. Well because it actually is all about the journey. 

Takeaway:

Establishing an emotional connection is crucial. While we may seem to take decision rationally, it is influenced by our emotions. If you can connect with your audience at this level, you can keep them hooked and drive more engagement. 

3. GoPro

4-gopro-for-brand-storytelling-examples

 Image Source: Bing Lee

GoPro has been mentioned by many as one of the best brands which has perfected storytelling.

It is touted to make the world’s most versatile cameras and was founded in 2002 by Nick Woodman.

In 2004, GoPro sold its first camera and since then the company has made it happen. The company doubled its net income from 2010 to 2011 at $24.6 million while spending around $50,000 for marketing. With around 4 Million YouTube subscribers, GoPro is one of the leading brands today.

Takeaway:

Harness the power of user generated content to turn your brand into a successful one. GoPro removed the pre-conceived notion that user-generated shaky videos, would not be good for sharing on social media.

Video cameras affixed to the helmets of skydivers and jumpers have now become extremely popular on media platforms. 

4. Sugru

5-sugru-for-brand-storytelling-examples

 Image Source: Frost Magazine

Sugru, which means ‘play’ in Irish, is the world’s first mouldable glue. You can fix and modify things easily with it, as it can be shaped for 30 minutes after being unpacked. Sugru is used across categories from home to outdoor, tech & gadget.

Sugru’s idea was conceived and developed by former design student Jane Ni Dhulchaointigh. She worked on the idea while working with mixtures of silicone sealants and sawdust. Then spent the next two years testing different formulations. By 2007, she had working samples. In 2009, sachets of Sugru were sent out to journalists. A video of Sugru in action went live and became viral. Sugru was named among the 50 best inventions of 2010 and had sold more than 5 million packs worldwide as of 2015.

Takeaway:

Identify your vision & mission and then stick to it. Sugru’s mission was to provide people an easy and fun play glue. In the words of Sugru’s inventor ‘Stand up for something and then stick to your purpose’.

5. Heineken

johnie-walker-for-brand-storytelling-examples

 Image Source: Wikipedia

In the 19th century, the beer industry was lead by entrepreneurial brewers and one such man was Gerard Adriaan Heineken. Gerard opened his family’s first brewery in Amsterdam in 1864. Though he could have brought his brand to the market in the 1860s, he chose to wait.  He wanted to turn Heineken into a premium brand rather than sacrificing quality.

His patience and determination paid off, and today the beer is sold in more than 196 countries. 

Takeaway:

Understand the customers needs and behaviour. That is what helped Heineken become a global brand, rather than just another beer. Failing to understand your customers behaviour may be a recipe for disaster. Since an individual’s buying behaviour is influenced by their beliefs and attitude, it is important to know what makes them tick. 

What makes a great brand story?

Points to consider:

  • Clarity in thought and action
  • Being conversational with your audience
  • Choosing a voice and tone correctly
  • Establishing a human connection
  • Avoiding vague and abstract ways of describing your brand story
  • Identifying what customers perceive your brand as and creating content accordingly
  • Being specific and targeted towards your audience & not anyone else

Communicating stats and facts provides direct evidence to support your statement, but it is the story which is powerful, memorable, and persuasive.

Guest Author: Lavanya Loomba is Content Marketing Manager at StoryXpress. His true love is reserved for creating impactful visual content. He also enjoys making cartoons in his spare time. Connect with him on Linkedin.

The post 5 Inspirational Brand Storytelling Examples To Energize Your Content Marketing appeared first on Jeffbullas’s Blog.

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15 Must-Have Features for E-commerce Sites by @HollystarPR

15 Must-Have Features for E-commerce Sites by @HollystarPR

All websites are unique in their own way. We’ve seen trends in e-commerce website design like animation, 360-degree product previews, advanced filtering, and dynamic product search. However, trends don’t guarantee conversion rates or robust user experiences. There are certain elements that every e-commerce site should have to stay relevant and competitive. Here is a list of 15 must-have features that attract online shoppers.

Ease of Use

This comes from the old K.I.S.S. adage about keeping it simple. Simplicity should be a goal in good design and you don’t have to sacrifice elegance to achieve it. As a matter of fact, studies show that 76% of consumers say the most important characteristic of a website is ease of use.

The objective is to help shoppers get to what they want, faster and without running into unnecessary complexity that can clog up the path to purchase.

Online sellers have minutes, if not seconds, to make a sale. Focus on the user experience by providing shopping categories, filters, and comparison capabilities. Consider easy-to-find customer reviews and FAQ information to help buyers make decisions more quickly.

E-commerce sites should be a competitive advantage instead of a troublesome experience.

High-Resolution Photos and Video

Gone are the days of posting one photo with a few bullet points and a price tag. Shoppers want to see multiple angles and people using the product in different environments. They want to be able to zoom in and get a feel for the product.

Technical considerations for images are crucial. Images that don’t load or take too long to load will see a consumer drop-off rate of 39%, according to Adobe.

Images sell, not text. E-commerce websites should display multiple photos per product. The photos need to be high-resolution and optimized for page load.

Mobile-Friendly Website

Google declared it, so it must be done. All websites are required to have a mobile-friendly version by 2017 or suffer the SEO consequences. If this isn’t reason enough, one in three online purchases is completed on a smartphone.

With a responsive website, content intuitively adapts to whatever device is accessing it to provide the most user-friendly experience. Shockingly, many sites still have not adopted a responsive or mobile version.

User-Generated Reviews

Shoppers read reviews. About 92% of them, in fact. The star rating on a product is the number one factor used by consumers.

You might think that having negative reviews is a sale killer. The opposite is actually true. Having negative reviews can often be a positive. It’s shown that products without negative reviews are seen as censored and, in turn, shoppers will assume the positive reviews are fake.

Depending on website functionality, e-commerce sites can use plugins from the most popular review platforms including Yelp, Foursquare, and Facebook.

Forward-thinking e-commerce sites, like Paiwen paddleboards, are using reviews as user-generated content to drive social proof and build raving fans.

15 Must-Have Features for E-commerce Sites | SEJ

Special Offers

Most e-commerce sites are using special offers in their standard marketing practices via email, social, text, etc. Next-level e-commerce sites take advantage of the prime real estate in the header section to promote special offers.

15 Must-Have Features for E-commerce Sites | SEJ

When shoppers realize they’re getting a special deal, it motivates them to buy more and spend more time searching the site.

If e-commerce sites are using ongoing promotions, providing a unique webpage that lists the offers will not only drive more sales but also improve SEO. Consider the shopper searching “zip code + toyota special offers” and the value of that organic search result.

15 Must-Have Features for E-commerce Sites | SEJ

Wish Lists

Oh, how I love wish lists. One for fashion, one for books to read, one for holiday gift ideas. Shop, save, and share!

E-commerce sites that aren’t using wish lists are leaving revenue on the virtual desktop table. What’s better than having customers bookmark items they want and will most likely buy in the future? That’s just gold in the pocket. And a remarketing campaign dream.

It’s also an opportunity to share a brand with new buyers. When shoppers share their wish lists with family and friends, it sends FREE traffic with built-in social proof to a website.

Find-in-Store

Not all e-commerce sites have brick and mortar stores. However, those that do must have a find-in-store feature. Sometimes you don’t want to wait for an item to ship. Instant gratification.

Shoppers are going online just to research and then complete the purchase in person. This is especially true for millennials, as 72% of young shoppers research online before purchasing in a store.

This makes it incredibly helpful to see which local stores have products in stock.

Related Items

Simply seeing the phrase, “you might like this” causes a serotonin release signaling curiosity and excitement. A related items feature on an e-commerce site creates the desirable stickiness effect that so many marketers strive to achieve.

It happens like this. You saved the AeroPress coffee maker to your shopping cart. A section emerges that says, “you might like this”. Would you like some freshly roasted, fair trade whole coffee beans? Maybe a digital scale to measure the exact amount of coffee grounds to achieve the perfect cup of coffee? You get the picture.

When an online seller uses a related items feature to sell more, it’s actually signaling to the buyer that “they get me”.

Related items can also include similar product categories to comparison shop, “people who bought this item also searched for”, and so on.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Complex purchases require confidence with a seller and detailed information when buying products online versus face-to-face.

At Forthea Interactive, our client, Fine Watch Bank, sells expertly crafted high-end watches. The company’s buyers need confirmation of watch authenticity and detailed product information to feel comfortable when making a purchase. An additional information section details frequently asked information, which establishes credibility and builds confidence with the buyer.

15 Must-Have Features for E-commerce Sites | SEJ

FAQ sections also provide a self-help area to address common customer problems. Buyers often ask about product support, returns, lost account passwords, etc.

Social Proof

Brands and online sellers that connect with their buyers on an emotional level create brand trust and advocacy. Social connection is undeniable and the opportunity to bond with an audience is easier now than ever. Linking social profiles and user-generated content with an e-commerce site are must-have features that will give online sellers brand character.

Shoppers are inundated with a constant flow of “buy now” and “get this”. It’s those brands that engage with customers socially that create customers for life. They are offering products that help others and that people care about.

Social media allows e-commerce brands to show authenticity and associate an emotional connection with their products. Look at Nike’s Pinterest account to see how incorporating products with motivational images makes a huge impact. See how Ikea uses user-generated content to share design ideas and inspiration for how to use its products. Check out how Lowe’s produces how-to videos that teach people how to use its products.

Security Features

Online transactions are an integral part of our lives. As such, e-commerce websites can be a lucrative target for cybercriminals. It’s crucial that online sellers protect customer information and take steps to ensure privacy.

It all starts with a secure e-commerce platform. With their sophisticated security features, it’s no wonder that Magento and WordPress paired with Woo Commerce are the top two platforms for online sellers.

Other must-have e-commerce security features to consider are:

  • SSL certificate: establishes secure connectivity between a user and the website. Look for HTTPS and a green lock in the address bar before trusting an online store with your information. Select an SSL certificate vendor with name recognition. The enterprise e-commerce giants almost always use Symantec.
  • Two-factor authentication: adds an extra layer of security by requiring username/password and a system-generated code sent via email or text.
  • Use a firewall: provides a gateway or wall between two networks and permits authorized traffic and blocking malicious traffic.
  • Privacy policy link in footer: addresses the website’s privacy policies and promises customer data is not shared with third parties.

Advanced Payment Options

In the world of Apple Pay and PayPal, advanced payment options are a must-have feature for an e-commerce site. Just consider the ease of use associated with Amazon one-click shopping. Shoppers with registered accounts can literally buy with the click of a button.

There are many popular online payment options. The key is understanding who the buyer is and implementing the most effective solutions. If a website is limiting payment options, make sure to explain why.

For example, an e-commerce site may not offer Bitcoin as a payment option after determining its value isn’t reliable. If buyers are technology-savvy individuals who tend toward this payment method, it’s important to be transparent as to why it isn’t an option. This transparency establishes that the brand understands its buyers and builds trust.

Detailed Shipping Information

Alarmingly, unexpected shipping costs are the number one reason for shopping cart abandonment. It’s critical that e-commerce websites include shipping information early in the checkout process, including a zip code calculator showing cost. It’s also helpful to include delivery time and options for faster delivery. Sites should list countries that are outside normal shipping zones.

Interestingly, shoppers spend 30% more per order when free shipping is included. Be sure to present codes for free shipping on all pages of the site through the header navigation, if applicable.

15 Must-Have Features for E-commerce Sites | SEJ

Multi-Touchpoint Contact Page

When it comes to running an e-commerce site where most business takes place online, nothing builds trust more than an overly obvious and well-presented “contact us” feature. This is especially true when selling high-end merchandise or technical products.

Never make it hard for a buyer to get in touch or request support. Consider the contact page a feature of the website. Include multiple ways to reach out, including phone, email, and an online form. Some companies with brick and mortar stores offer online appointment setting via their contact page. Be sure to add customer service social links and Google maps for locations.

Return Policy

Return policies are an essential feature of any e-commerce website. The stats below really speak for themselves, but a return policy should be clearly visible and well-written or illustrated. This is another trust-building feature of online selling. It reassures buyers that if they are unhappy or just need a different size, the brand is there for them.

A 2016 infographic and survey by Invesp shows:

  • At least 30% of all products ordered online are returned.
  • 92% of consumers will buy again if product return process is easy.
  • 67% of shoppers check the returns page before making a purchase.

These must-have e-commerce site features could be grouped into categories like Duh, DOH! and Ahhh. Marketers and web designers might say “duh” when it comes to incorporating ease of use, high-resolution photos, security features, and contact information. As they are best practices and trademarks of good design.

There are others who would say “DOH!” when considering elements like special offers, user-generated reviews, and social sharing. They know they should be using these features but just haven’t gotten around to implementing them. It’s never too late!

Finally, the “ahhh” moment when you get excited about planning for robust related items, shareable wish lists, and find-in-store features.

No matter what category you’re in, e-commerce sites have an incredible opportunity to use tried-and-true features blended with innovative new elements to create fantastic shopping experiences.

Image Credits

Featured Image: beachboyx10/DepositPhotos
Screenshots by Holly Gary. Taken December 2016

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10 Ways to Find Trending Topics and Ideas for Your WordPress Blog Posts

10 Ways to Find Trending Topics and Ideas for Your WordPress Blog Posts
If you want to write articles about trending topics, then trying to keep up-to-date with everything happening in your niche can be a full-time job in itself. Fortunately, there are tools and techniques available that can help make this process easier. Content about trending topics is beneficial because you know that what you’re writing about is […]

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Will Facebook 360 Change Brand Storytelling Forever? by @chris_hart

Will Facebook 360 Change Brand Storytelling Forever? by @chris_hart

Facebook 360 launched in 2015, but we have yet to see advertisers and marketers embrace it on a wider scale. In this article, we’ll look at how brands are using 360 content, and answer burning questions about the medium—including hearing from industry experts on how it’s changing the storytelling game.

Facebook 360 launched in 2015, first with video capability, and then photo functionality in 2016. The goal? Allow users to immerse themselves in the landscapes and experiences of those who’ve captured them and to elevate the storytelling experience.

Some brands have been quick to jump on the feature, producing visually stunning examples, while others still feel timid about Facebook 360, its potential and the effort involved.

We have yet to see advertisers and marketers really embrace it on a wider scale, but some are getting it right. Let’s look closer at what Facebook 360 is, examples of 360-degree content, where it’s headed, and tips to get started.

What Are Some Examples of 360-Degree Content?

Brands are using 360-degree videos for everything from marketing to education and simply connecting with their audience in new ways.

National Geographic is allowing people to explore geography like never before in their Facebook 360 videos. Here’s an example you can check out in a video on Victoria Falls.

YouTube offers the ability to upload 360-degree videos as well, and here’s a Sports Illustrated documentary on Everest using 360-degree capability that you can access via desktop or mobile:

VIDEO

How Is Facebook 360 Advancing Storytelling for Brands?

Breathtaking imagery aside, 360 content has major potential for brands to rethink their storytelling.

“This medium has had an immense impact on how we think about stories moving forward,” says Mars Sandoval, founder and creative director at Syndrome Studio. “The interactive, non-linear format is a big departure from how content has been both imagined and consumed in the past, and the medium demands an entirely new and different approach to storytelling.

“Unlike the tightly controlled ‘one-way’ narratives of traditional video, the user experience aspect presents an ‘open world’ of discovery for the user and an exciting set of challenges and opportunities for content creators and marketers to consider.”

Facebook 360 does indeed put users into an immersive environment to experience moments in a way that’s a big departure from the traditional screen experience.

While this may seem foreign to many content creators now, it could be second nature in the future. Think back to when magazine publications had to transition to the online experience, and how that redefined the way content was consumed. The end result was much more interactive, where the user chose the path.

With 360 content, the user is again in the driver’s seat so long as the format is available by content publishers.

“Facebook 360 has changed content storytelling for the better,” says Kendall Bird, social media manager for Collegis Education. “It has become a way for the common photo or video to come to life and make an experience for the user … building excitement and motivating audiences more than ever to engage with content.”

Is Facebook 360 Considered Virtual Reality?

Facebook 360 allows users on certain devices to interact with video and content in new ways. On desktop and mobile, a person can scroll left, right, up or down using their mouse or a finger to view the scene almost as if they were there.

Facebook 360 content is indeed compatible with VR technology like Oculus Rift or Samsung Gear VR, though some doubt its place in the world of virtual reality proper, citing that just because it’s a 360 video, doesn’t truly make it VR.

As this article points out  on Quartz:

Both Facebook and YouTube now allow anyone to upload 360-degree videos to their platforms. That means if you have a Cardboard, Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, or anything else that could be construed as a virtual reality headset, you can watch immersive videos on your device. But that doesn’t make them virtual reality, seeing as a video of someone surfing or playing soccer in 360-degree video isn’t virtual—it really happened!—so that’s really just reality.

Semantics aside, many of us see it as a form of VR because it’s taking our experiences with content to a new, more realistic level.

“The user can experience another place, from another time, through their own technology – and they don’t have to purchase anything extra,” says Kendall. “No plane tickets, rental cars, or trains, just you and your computer or mobile phone, and you’re experiencing a place and time as if you were really there.”

Mars has his own take on Facebook 360 as VR: “At the present, we would consider Facebook 360 as one of the many ‘flavors’ of VR. From a creator standpoint, the design and production methods are quite similar, although ‘pure’ VR is more layered, complex and usually makes use of VR goggles.”

He adds, “What makes Facebook 360 so exciting is how it democratizes the medium, opening virtual reality up to anyone with a smartphone/web browser and a Facebook account. It really is the Wild West right now—platforms, workflows, and people’s tastes are evolving so quickly. The medium is being redefined constantly, making it an exciting time for the entire field of VR.”

Isn’t 360 Content Just a Fad?

While there could be a slow adoption process with 360 video and imagery, market motivators may push its usage along. For example, this type of content couples well with the mobile experience, and research time and time again points to video as an effective medium for mobile users.

As brands start to think more about how to create mobile experiences for their audiences, visually appealing content—and particularly 360-degree video and photography—will take those mobile experiences to the next level.

“Like any new and exciting innovation, especially when tied to advertising, there is a high novelty factor early on,” says Mars. “Everyone jumps on the bandwagon at the onset, but over time, a few really grasp the medium and master how to use it in an effective way.”

“For example, think about how many companies rushed to release an app in the early days of the iPhone. Many of these first generation apps were simply a copy of a website, offering little else in terms of content, function, and user experience … As the medium matures, we are beginning to see some really great examples of VR being used in interesting ways … Many avenues for advertising are opening up, and as the medium is embraced by more consumers and the user base grows, there will be more opportunities to redefine marketing in the VR space.”

We can indeed imagine how this new medium might in the future merge online and offline experiences in real-time, or facilitate key initiatives for all sorts of sectors like education, sports, law enforcement and beyond.

As the glossiness of all new technology wears off after a while, what’s left is the substantive stories that are being told through the medium. Leading with the story and not the technology is going to be important for this new content medium to be effective and to have staying power in the marketing and advertising world.

Getting Started With Facebook 360

With the right equipment and a little imagination, brands can get in on the 360 action quite easily, and the possibilities are exciting.

If the popularity of the GoPro cams is any indicator, the perspective will greatly open up for the content consumer from a place of being more linear and prescribed to multi-directional and personalized.

You can learn more about getting started with Facebook 360 here.

Image credits:
Featured Image: Pexels / Hands Coffee Smartphone Technology
Video: Sports Illustrated / Capturing Everest Teaser | 360 Video | Sports Illustrated

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59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) by @seo_travel

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) by @seo_travel

In 2016, I consumed more marketing material than I ever have. While the internet is packed with some truly awful content, it’s home to some real beauties as well.

This post is intended to highlight some of the best things I read over the last year which, if you haven’t seen already, definitely need to be added to your reading list.

My favorite posts are always those that inspire action and provide suggestions that you can take away and use yourself, and I guarantee that if you consume everything here and act on just a few of the tips, you’ll be a better marketer for it.

So, without further ado…

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

Starting with a recent post, this study from Matthew Barby is an incredibly useful insight into what’s required to rank well. It’s always nice to have some recent data that looks into ranking factors, and this post provides just that in incredible depth.

An extremely comprehensive guide to keyword research that breaks down the best tools and how to use them. With the recent changes in Keyword Planner, this is a really useful read.

A fantastic insight into dwell time, an often misunderstood phenomenon, and its impact on search results. If nothing else, the definitions for dwell time, time on site, and bounce rate are worth bookmarking this.

Cyrus Shepard’s post from early in the year is a beautifully simplified way to look at optimizing pages on your site, and people would do well to take a step back and reassess their sites with this in mind. The tip? “Optimize for how users are actually using the page — as opposed to how you optimized the page ahead of time.” 

I’m a big fan of Nick’s writing, and this post is a real eye-opener. For those who talk about technical SEO being dead, read this and weep. It’s an incredibly interesting case study, as well as being home to some really useful technical suggestions we should all heed, especially when dealing with huge sites.

Quality vs. quantity has been a hot topic through 2016. This case study from SimilarWeb provided more proof of the importance of monitoring the pages you have indexed and only keeping those that offer a good user experience and provide real value.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

With the impending labeling of insecure sites in Google’s search results, moving to HTTPS is a more prominent issue than ever. Fortunately, Aleyda has broken down everything we need to know.

I’ve never seen such a thorough guide to using excel for SEO and have already picked up a number of great, time-saving tips from this post. I’m sure you will, too.

A start-to-finish breakdown of what you need to do to improve your traffic. It’s packed with information and actionable tips, which is always the key things I look for in content I love. Don’t miss this one.

You might well have seen this one unless you’ve been living under a rock for the year. But for the few who haven’t, it’s a must. Again, these are actionable tips that you can take and use straight-away, which is something Brian Dean delivers time and time again.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

People often struggle at the first hurdle with content by not knowing what to target and how to structure the content they do create. This post shows you how to use Analytics to make that process easier – I’d recommend watching the webinar in it, too.

A lack of ideas is often the reason that people stop blogging (or don’t start in the first place). That’s no longer an excuse with Griffin’s help here – you’ll end up with more ideas for 2017 than you can shake a stick at.

More ideas! Now there’s really no excuse!

47 more options! If you’re still staring at a blank page then there’s no saving you…

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

You’ve got your topic ideas, time for the headline. Don’t worry, read this and you’re all set there, too.

Unsurprisingly, Jason goes into incredible depth and gives a ton of actionable suggestions in this post and it will leave you with a nice to-do list that will keep you going until the end of 2017.

A nice summary of the year from Buzzsumo which should give you plenty of food for thought on the types of content you could create in 2017, with some nice examples to inspire you as well.

A really useful lesson for writers in how to approach their articles based on the kind of readers who will be consuming it. There are examples of the kind of content you should create for each personality type that you can take away and create for yourself.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

For those still unsure of whether content marketing is for them, this step-by-step breakdown on Problogger should make it an easy decision to give it a go. Tactics, tools, ideas — it’s all in here.

Those people who are unsure would do well to read this one, too. It discusses realistic expectation setting and important lessons on what’s required to be successful. But also proof that when done well it can bring a valuable return.

I’m a big fan of Ross Hudgens’ work and this is a stand-out piece from him. If you’re looking for a process to follow with your content marketing, this is it.

Another fantastic how-to that should inspire you to follow in Devesh’s footsteps. Plus, he tells you exactly what you need to do it.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

If you’re not satisfied with the tools Devesh suggests then here’s a ton more for you to check out. Pick and choose the ones that will be the best fit for you.

Here are the pitfalls to avoid. Take this insight and make sure you don’t waste your time going about things the wrong way.

One of the biggest problems in most people’s content marketing strategy? They don’t spend enough time promoting the content they create. Here’s a raft of ways you can put that right.

So you’ve recognized the importance of promotion, here’s how to do it right. Spammy emails won’t cut it, you need to be more tactical and thoughtful about your approach, as Darmawan tells you here.

Sujan is my go-to guy on the web for outreach tips. You should read this post closely and then go and read a load of his other ones, too.

Measuring the value of your content marketing activity is crucial to ensure you identify what’s working, what isn’t, and whether your overriding strategy is the right one. The title of this one is bang on – it is extremely comprehensive.

Some inspiring examples from HubSpot to get your creative juices flowing. I always find real-life examples (that I can take and put my own spin on) really helpful, so if you’re the same I’ve no doubt you’ll like it, too.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

Glen never fails to disappoint, and many of his blog posts this year have gained a lot of attention (you may have seen his post about 16 companies dominating Google). But this is the one that stood out for me and went slightly more under-the-radar. If you’re in need of advanced link building inspiration, look no further.

Jon Cooper’s resource from 2012 has always been my go-to when I need new link building ideas, and this resource from Joshua Hardwick has taken that and gone a step further with great design, a handy filtering system, and bucketloads of actionable tips. Bookmark it.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

Gael Breton preaches great content and authority building, and this post does a great job of practicing what he preaches. For the guest posters out there, this is invaluable.

There are a lot of posts about image link building out there, but I’ve never seen a better step-by-step guide than this. All the resources you need, all the actions, and great examples. If you haven’t tried image link building before, start here.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

If you’re a marketer and you’re not on Reddit, you need to drop everything and sign up now. But whatever you do, don’t go and be a marketer there. The insight you get into what works and what’s popular is amazing and you can learn a lot from that, which is benefit enough. But if you participate naturally and occasionally drop in some content you’ve created that’s exceptional, you might just hit a big win, too. Learn how with this breakdown from Eddy Azar.

Test, test, test. You should always be playing with different types of content and measuring what works best, especially on social. These 10 ideas will get you started nicely.

Short of inspiration for your social updates. Here you go. Thank you Buffer.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

A great post on the importance of being the first to comment on a post if you want to be seen and heard. The data is from Reddit, but the conclusion can be taken and applied to any popular forum or blog where there is a lot of community participation.

If you’re interested in using Facebook advertising then you’ll like this. A simple but in-depth guide on the best way to build your email list with ads, without spending mountains of cash. It’s written for bloggers, but could easily be employed by businesses, too.

If you’ve already got a handle on Facebook ads then this post will take you to the next level. More complex tactics that need a bit more knowledge of how the platform works, but some mega tips for those who want to take their advertising to the next level.

Snapchat is the current trendy marketing platform and the majority of businesses still don’t know how to use it. This list gives you 50 people to follow where you can watch and learn.

More people to follow, this time on Twitter. If you aren’t following these 20 people, then go and get adding!

With the impending importance of moving to HTTPS, social share counts are at a big risk of being lost, along with all the social proof and ego boost that goes with it. Fortunately, if you’re on WordPress, there is a solution. You need to pay for it, but if you’ve accumulated a lot of social love for the content you’ve been creating, it’s worth it, right?

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

The first challenge of email marketing is getting people on your list. This post gives you 21 ways to do just that, and they’re all valuable ones (no fluff here).

A collection of tips from the very best. From what to include in emails to how to get better open rates, each one provides great value.

More tips from more experts. More great value.

Fantastic insight into how to send an email to your list and get a good open rate, even if you haven’t contacted them in a while. If you’re struggling for an email format to use with your list then this should get the juices flowing.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

It’s a beautiful day when you set up a successful email automation process, but it isn’t easy. This guide from Razor social will help you do just that and take your email game to the next level.

Unsubscribers. The soul destroyers of the email world. But what if you could stop them leaving, rescue them from the jaws of defeat? Kaitlyn gives some great examples of brands we can all learn from.

I love examples, they give you something very tangible to aim for. HubSpot brings together some fantastic email marketing ones here to inspire your email exploits.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

A top-to-bottom analysis of Expedia’s conversion rate optimization techniques. It struck a particular chord with me as someone who specializes in travel, but it offers insight for people in any industry. It’s a two-parter; you can read the second one here.

No 2016 rundown would be complete without a nod to the election and this post on Unbounce is a fitting way to do it. The impact of marketing on this year’s result has been well documented and how better to learn from it than getting the experts to tear each campaign apart?

The perfect landing page. Fairly straightforward, right? Wrong. Here are more than 7,000 words and 93 examples telling you what’s needed. It’s a long one, but if you want to convert better it’s definitely worth your time.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

There were some other gems out there that didn’t fall into any of the categories above but that are still well worth a read:

An excellent commentary on the power of controversy in gaining coverage, and how marketing teams exploit it.

Want to convince more people to buy your product or service? Pricing strategy is a key place you can do that, and Nick Kolenda’s given you 42 ways to make yours better. With science and everything.

If you have a great product then referral marketing is a fantastic way to build awareness of your brand quickly. This guide will show you how to do it, with examples from the best in the business like Uber, BackCountry, and AirBnB.

59 Marketing Posts You Probably Missed in 2016 (and Need to Read) | SEJ

Who wouldn’t want the ego boost of being interviewed by a popular blog and feeling like you’ve made it? It doesn’t have to just be the marketing celebrities that get interviewed; Ann Smarty breaks down how you can get yourself (and your brand) in the limelight.

Virtual Reality has been mooted as the next big thing for a while, but is it something you should be paying attention to? Yes. Here’s why.

Now that you’re on board, here are some ideas on how you can use it.

We’ll finish with an epic post from Kevin Ho. He knows how to grow a business from nothing, and he’s been kind enough to put together 100 very specific tips that you can use for yourself. I challenge you to go and implement ten of them in the next seven days.

Summary

The last sentence there is the most important one in this post. There is a lot of reading to be done to get through these articles, and I would recommend doing it because you’ll learn some incredibly useful things to put into action for your own business or personal brand. But that’s the key – putting them into action.

There’s no point reading tens of thousands of words of material if you don’t do anything with it. So make that your target for 2017 – try to implement one tip from each of these suggestions before the end of the year. If you do, I have no doubt you’ll make some great progress. Good luck!

Image Credits

Featured Image: Pexels/Pixabay.com
Screenshots by Tom Mcloughlin. Taken December 2016.

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How to Delegate SEO Work Effectively

How to Delegate SEO Work Effectively

Posted by zeehj

Whether you’re the only SEO at your company, work within a larger team, or even manage others, you still have to stay on top of your projects. Project management skills aren’t and shouldn’t be exclusive to someone (or some tool) with the title “project manager.” I believe that having good project manager skills is essential to getting work done at all, let alone delivering high-quality work in a timely and efficient way.

In defense of management

Freakonomics Radio released this podcast episode in October called In Praise of Maintenance. The TL;DR (or TL;DL, rather) is that our society rewards innovators, but rarely (if ever) celebrates the maintainers: the people who get sh*t done, and do it reliably, often without anyone’s noticing. This podcast episode confirmed what I’d been feeling for a long time: We don’t award enough praise to the good project managers out there who keep engagements moving forward. And that’s largely because it’s not a sexy job: it’s not exciting to report to stakeholders that necessary services that have been reliable for so long are, as always, continuing to be reliable.

It’s only when things aren’t running smoothly does it seem project managers get recognition. A lack of a rewards system means that we’re not teaching PMs, Consultants, Account Managers, and more that their excellent organizational skills are their most valuable asset. Instead, the message being communicated is that innovation is the only praise-worthy result, which oftentimes may not be essential to getting your work done. The irony here is that innovation is the by-product of an excellent project management framework. The situational awareness of knowing how to delegate work to your colleagues and a repertoire of effective organizational habits is vital if you ever want to free up your attention to allow for the headspace and concentration ingenuity requires.

Sound familiar? Lately I’ve been focused on the idea of a cluttered headspace, where it feels like everything on your to-do list is floating ephemerally around in your head, and you can’t seem to pin down what needs to be done. Of course, this isn’t specific to just professional life (or consulting work): it can happen with personal tasks, which can present their own set of organizational challenges. Regardless of your professional role, crunch time is exactly when you need to put on your project manager hat and get yourself organized. Read on to find out the tools and tricks I use to stay on top of my work, and how I delegate work when needed without losing a personal touch on projects.

Manage projects with tools that work for you

What do you do to make that process easier? One Slack conversation that seems to always come up is which project management tools do we use (and which is best). I take the annoying middle-ground stance of “whatever tool you use is best” and I stand by it (don’t worry, I’ll get to the actual list in a minute): a tool is only useful if it’s actually used.

So how do you get started? It’s always important to have preferred methods for project tracking, note keeping, and reminders. Depending on your role and learning style, you may find that some tools work better than others for you. For instance, while I have a few tools I work with to stay on top of client work, I also have a clear plastic desk cover that I can jot down notes and reminders on. Here’s a breakdown of the tools I use to manage projects, and the needs they meet.

  • Inbox by Gmail. Yes, it’s different from classic Gmail. The two greatest aspects of Inbox, in my opinion, is the ability to snooze emails until a specific day and time, and save reminders for yourself (e.g. “Check in on Ty’s progress for the page speed audit,” or “Watch the video in this link after work”).

    Why are these my favorite Inbox features? Both functions serve similar purposes: they tell you what you need to know, when you need to know it. The ability to snooze emails and save reminders for yourself is invaluable when we’re talking about headspace: this way, you can use your email as your to-do list for any given day. If you know you don’t have to respond to someone until X date, there’s no reason their previous email should sit in your Inbox taking up space. As a result, I use Inbox as my personal assistant to remind me when I need to jump back to a deliverable or respond to a client. It’s possible to reach Inbox zero on a given day, even if you have an email awaiting your response. Just snooze it and attend to it when you really need to.

  • Google Drive. Sure, not a sexy or new tool, but it’s my home for everything. Not only does GDrive cover all the file types that I need (Documents, Sheets, and Presentations), it also allows for easy, real-time collaboration on files with your colleagues and clients. If you like to nudge people to do things, too, you can assign contacts work to do from your GDocs (just highlight text, click the comment icon to the right, and insert the @ symbol with their name). If you’re crafting a presentation with a colleague, for instance, you can assign slides with questions for them. I recommend tagging them with your question and including a due date for when you need their answer.
  • Tools my colleagues love:
    • Trello. It’s not my personal favorite, but a lot of my teammates love using Trello as their to-do lists, or even for tracking web dev or SEO projects. If you prefer text over visuals, you can also try Basecamp (which I tend to prefer).
    • Asana. Another great project management tool — I tend to use it on a project basis rather than a to-do list. If you’re a developer, you may prefer JIRA.

Of course, it’s possible to manage and delegate work without these, but I’m of the mind that pen, paper, and email can only get you so far, especially if you want your delegation process to be somewhat automated (think tagging colleagues in comments within documents, or assigning projects to them within standard project management tools like Asana).

How to delegate effectively

Tools can only get you so far: any good delegation process starts with a conversation (no more than five or 10 minutes) about the work you need and a great brief. The conversation establishes whether your colleague actually has the bandwidth to take your work on, and the brief goes into greater detail of what you actually need done. The brief format I follow works for a large number of different deliverables — I’ve used this same layout to delegate page speed, technical and backlink audits, and content briefs to colleagues. Below are the fields I always include, and the type of information always provided:

Subject: [BRIEF] Work I Need Done

Deadline: The precise date and time you need it, with enough time for you to review the work before delivering it to your stakeholders or your client. If it’s something like a page speed audit, I would allow up to a full week to review it and ensure that it’s in the best format and all the information is correct. Of course, it also depends on how familiar the delegate is with projects like these — if they’ve done a number of audits for you in the past, they may know your style and you may not need as much time to edit their final work.

Output/Deliverable: The format in which you need this work delivered to you. Maybe it’s a Google Doc or an Excel Spreadsheet. This brief format can work for any output you need, including more creative pieces (do you need a video edited to :30 seconds in a .mov format? A photo edited to certain specs and saved as a PNG or IDD?).

Expected hours: This may be the most challenging element of the entire brief. How long do you anticipate this work to take, start to finish? Keep in mind the experience level of the person to whom you’re delegating. Is this their first SEO technical audit, or their 30th? You will almost definitely need to check in with your delegate a few times (more on that later), so how long do you anticipate these meetings to take? Just like the deadline timing estimate, use your best judgment based on work you’ve done with this person in the past, and the type of work you’re assigning.

Relevant materials: This is where you can provide additional articles or tools that should help your colleague do the work you’ve assigned to them. Some good examples are 101 articles (like ones on the Moz blog!), or a tool you know you always use in projects like the one you’re delegating (think SEMRush, new photo editing software, or Google’s Keyword Planner).

Check in with your delegate along the way

Once you’ve delivered your brief, the next step is to make sure you check in with your delegate along the way. Even the most experienced person can benefit from added context, so whether it’s an in-person meeting or a five-minute call, touching base shortly after delivering a brief is necessary to ensure you’re on the same page. Beyond kicking off a project, it’s important to have check-ins along the way to stay on track.

At Distilled, we like to follow a check-in model at the following completion points:

  • 1% (kickoff conversation);
  • 5% (validation of process);
  • 30% (ensure you’re on the right track before you invest too much time into the project);
  • and 90% (final editing and proofing).

Not only is this good to keep everyone on the right track, it’s even more valuable both to the person delegating and the delegate to know how much work should be completed at which points, and how much detail is required as you give feedback.

In many ways, great project management and delegation skills are really future-proofing skills. They allow you to be on top of your work regardless of what work (or life) throws at you. You can be the best SEO in the world, but if you can’t manage your projects effectively, you’ll either fail or not see the greatest impact you otherwise could achieve. It’s time to ditch praising the model of a lone innovator who somehow “does it all,” and instead truly celebrate the maintainers and managers who ensure things remain operational and steady. Often, our biggest problems aren’t best solved with a complex solution, but rather a clear mind and supportive team.

A large part of turning projects around comes down to improving the project management process, and being organized allows you to juggle multiple clients and acknowledge when you’re at capacity. Without a solid foundation of project management skills, there is no groundwork for successful innovations and client projects. The next time you’re looking to bolster your skill set, do an audit of how you manage your own work, and identify all of the things that prevent you from delivering the best work on time.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

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A complete list of the most hilarious searches in 2016

A complete list of the most hilarious searches in 2016

Seer presents our second annual list of the funniest, strangest, and all-around most interesting searches over the last year. People around the world turn to search engines to help them solve their everyday problems and questions, from relationship troubles to self-improvement tips.

Looking ahead to 2017, remember – never stop utilizing the impactful, yet underrated search query report to investigate what questions your users have to keep your accounts in tip-top shape.

Relationship Trouble

  • i need to discover all my wifes email accounts
  • How do i tell my husband we need counseling
  • discover all email accounts for my wife

Gift Giving

  • worst groomsmen gifts
  • whats stores to buy my mans clothes at
  • jeans for men butt
  • google show me some solid white vans for guys

  • Howcto start up famkly ghost investigate business
  • i am looking to become an affiliate marketer but i don’t know how is there some cheap way to learn
  • computer and information systems manager job description salary and how long you would have to go to school to be one
  • early childhood education working with young children how can i become an early childhood educator where can i teach

Self-Improvement

  • how to never tie your shoes again
  • Lil wayne phd in psychology
  • how 2 become a geneoligist
  • Get natural bee therapy
  • Are the good times really over for mutual funds

  • spitting on someone involves internal investigation
  • best way to press release someone leaving a company who was fired
  • As a nurse how many hours do i work
  • which is not word processing software

  • why are klogs so ugly
  • okay google show me carlos santana’s hats
  • Bad ass shoos
  • a good shoe to cut grass in
  • whats wrong with womans clothing stores today
  • ymc japanese denim ymc japanese denim ymc japanese denim ymc japanese denim
  • google show me some solid white vans for guys
  • can you show me flat shoes made by ecco

Internet Help

  • who discovered the email
  • what is the best construction app for a three year old
  • I have web hosting now what
  • find who is emailing me
  • name three different software programs you could use to create a poster advertise a disco
  • why we collect customers email and name on your landing page give me the perfect answer

  • why doesn t mars have water for us to drink
  • why do mugs have tiny holes
  • does university help you with learning how to cook

Don’t forget to check in on your accounts regularly to make sure you’re not wasting ad spend on irrelevant searches – no matter how hilarious they are. May 2017 bring you relevant search queries (..and maybe some funny ones too!)

via SEER Interactive Read More…

A complete list of the most hilarious searches in 2016

A complete list of the most hilarious searches in 2016

Seer presents our second annual list of the funniest, strangest, and all-around most interesting searches over the last year. People around the world turn to search engines to help them solve their everyday problems and questions, from relationship troubles to self-improvement tips.

Looking ahead to 2017, remember – never stop utilizing the impactful, yet underrated search query report to investigate what questions your users have to keep your accounts in tip-top shape.

Relationship Trouble

  • i need to discover all my wifes email accounts
  • How do i tell my husband we need counseling
  • discover all email accounts for my wife

Gift Giving

  • worst groomsmen gifts
  • whats stores to buy my mans clothes at
  • jeans for men butt
  • google show me some solid white vans for guys

  • Howcto start up famkly ghost investigate business
  • i am looking to become an affiliate marketer but i don’t know how is there some cheap way to learn
  • computer and information systems manager job description salary and how long you would have to go to school to be one
  • early childhood education working with young children how can i become an early childhood educator where can i teach

Self-Improvement

  • how to never tie your shoes again
  • Lil wayne phd in psychology
  • how 2 become a geneoligist
  • Get natural bee therapy
  • Are the good times really over for mutual funds

  • spitting on someone involves internal investigation
  • best way to press release someone leaving a company who was fired
  • As a nurse how many hours do i work
  • which is not word processing software

  • why are klogs so ugly
  • okay google show me carlos santana’s hats
  • Bad ass shoos
  • a good shoe to cut grass in
  • whats wrong with womans clothing stores today
  • ymc japanese denim ymc japanese denim ymc japanese denim ymc japanese denim
  • google show me some solid white vans for guys
  • can you show me flat shoes made by ecco

Internet Help

  • who discovered the email
  • what is the best construction app for a three year old
  • I have web hosting now what
  • find who is emailing me
  • name three different software programs you could use to create a poster advertise a disco
  • why we collect customers email and name on your landing page give me the perfect answer

  • why doesn t mars have water for us to drink
  • why do mugs have tiny holes
  • does university help you with learning how to cook

Don’t forget to check in on your accounts regularly to make sure you’re not wasting ad spend on irrelevant searches – no matter how hilarious they are. May 2017 bring you relevant search queries (..and maybe some funny ones too!)

via Seer Interactive Read More…

6 New Year’s Resolutions for the Modern Day Marketer by @seocompanymiami

6 New Year’s Resolutions for the Modern Day Marketer by @seocompanymiami

Most people make resolutions at the turn of the year—lose the weight, eat better, work on relationships with friends and family, etc. But how many people think about creating resolutions for their business? The New Year is a great time to improve yourself both personally and professionally, break out of your comfort zone, experiment with new ideas, and take on new challenges. Here is a list of New Year’s resolutions that could help enhance your business in 2017.

Resolution 1: Consider Updating Your Look

The New Year is often a great time to try out a new haircut or wardrobe, so why not consider updating your business’s look as well? This doesn’t have to mean a complete overhaul (in fact, we don’t recommend changing everything about your brand). Instead, think of a few simple updates you could incorporate to give your company a fresh and perhaps more functional style. This could be anything from revamping your home page to better optimize your mobile presence to adding a new feature to your blog. Think about what would benefit your business the most and then start there. Small and simple is key—no need to make a lot of major changes that might scare consumers away. Just show them you’re embracing the New Year and looking for ways to continue to improve your business.

Resolution 2: Collaborate With Sales

2017 is a great time to resolve to coordinate your marketing and sales teams so they’re not operating completely independently from one another. The Act-On blog suggests scheduling regular meetings between the two groups, creating a survey asking both sides to measure the other’s effectiveness, and planning out a comprehensive audit. Once both groups are on the same page about where they need to go, consider getting them together to brainstorm and then form a plan to best drive sales. As they say, two heads are better than one, and the input of two teams could be immeasurably valuable. You can learn more about how these departments can work together here.

6 New Year's Resolutions for the Modern Day Marketer | SEJResolution 3: Up Your Blog Posting Game

Quality content has a major impact on SEO, so focusing on the quality of your blog posts is a great resolution for 2017. Review your analytics data and try to determine the type of content that has the most positive effect on revenue for your business. Look at various promotion channels, keyword rankings, etc. and try to put together a solid content strategy.

Specifically, in terms of blog posting, it’s always a good idea to post often, but make sure you’re posting quality content. Your posts should be “meaty”, or full of substance. There’s a time for short and sweet posts, but those aren’t usually the ones that get shared all over social media. Don’t wait until the last minute to come up with ideas as, most likely, they’ll end up lacking. Finally, don’t forget to promote your posts all over your various social media channels. Need an example? Check out this post by QuickSprout designed to help others learn from the author’s big mistake.

Resolution 4: Make Data Your Friend

While it may be tempting to jump from one new analytics tool to the next, consider finding one you like, sticking with it, and really learning its ins and outs. Too many business owners don’t take the time to truly learn how to use analytics, so they miss out on a lot of potential opportunities. Numbers don’t lie, and they can give you an incredible amount of insight into your company’s successes and failures. They can also save you a lot of wasted time and money spent on campaigns and strategies that just aren’t delivering.

Keep in mind, you should be looking to metrics before creating content to find out exactly what type gets the best results and/or attracts the most amount of people. Data can teach you everything you need to know about your buyers and their interactions, and it can help you make informed, data-driven decisions. Consider adopting CRM and marketing automation, just make sure you learn how to use it so its potential isn’t wasted.

Resolution 5: Get MORE Social

Social media empowers you and your team to share your content, knowledge, and expertise with millions of people from all over the world.” The more you connect with others, the greater the potential for your business. So if you’re not already using Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, or Instagram, your first step is to pick a couple of those platforms and start posting. However, for most of us, if you’re already pretty social, it’s time to start evaluating the relationships you have with your followers. While having a huge audience probably makes you feel pretty good, if you’re not engaging with them, most likely you’re leaving them feeling a little empty.

Try to make real connections with your followers by posting more mindful content, asking for feedback, and going Live, among other options. Listen to what they have to say then incorporate solutions and topics into your social realm. In addition, consider adding social media advertising to your marketing strategy. This is a proven strategy that results in more traffic to your site, higher conversions, and improved brand loyalty. Who doesn’t want to take advantage of that?

Resolution 6: Give Back

There’s never a bad time to give back to the community and, while Giving Tuesday is often a popular day to do it, starting a new year with a new charitable campaign sounds like a pretty good idea as well. Many businesses use the holidays to amp up their marketing and make as much money as they can. While we appreciate a good business strategy, it’s refreshing when a company goes out of their way to give back as well. Think about a charity that’s meaningful to you and that is also somehow related to your business and/or product(s). Come up with a goal and a time frame, and start advertising. Consumers are generally in the giving mood during the holidays, so not only should they respond positively to your act of goodwill, most likely they’ll thank you with increased traffic to your site and additional conversions. Plus, you can feel good that you’ve done something positive to help others.

6 New Year's Resolutions for the Modern Day Marketer | SEJ

Image Credits

Featured Image: Wavebreakmedia/DepositPhotos
All Screenshots Taken by Author 12/18/2016

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