10 Tips for Running an Effective Facebook Contest

10 Tips for Running an Effective Facebook Contest

10 Tips for Running an Effective Facebook Contest | Social Media TodayA Facebook contest is a great way of extending your reach, driving engagement, and getting your brand seen by even more people – after all, Facebook has a staggering 1.23 billion daily active users on average.

But how do you run a contest without wasting your time and money, while also keeping within Facebook’s strict contest guidelines?

Here are 10 key tips to help you get started:

1. Understand Facebook’s contest guidelines

As noted, Facebook has strict rules governing on-platform contests, so make sure you’re familiar with them before running your own.

Take a look at Facebook’s Page guidelines to avoid unwittingly breaking the rules – and don’t forget to review them again for each contest you run, as Facebook can make changes at any time.

2. Know what you want to achieve

It can be tempting to run a Facebook contest just for fun, but if you don’t know what you hope to gain from it, how will you know whether it is successful?

Spend some time clearly defining your goals before you get started.

For example, you may want to use it to promote your products, drive more people to your website or generate buzz around your brand. Once you know your objectives, you can keep these in mind during the planning process.

3. Pick a relevant prize

Make entering your contest worth people’s while by offering a relevant and worthy prize.

Keep your target audience in mind here – if you offer a prize that isn’t related to your key demographic, you may end up attracting a lot of entrants who aren’t actually interested in your business or products.

4. Choose your contest type

Next, decide what type of Facebook contest you plan to run.

You could ask your followers to caption a photo, to post their own photo or video on your wall, to comment on a post, or to answer a question. Keep in mind that these contests will need to be judged by someone, and you may end up with hundreds of entries to look through.

An alternative is to consider running a straightforward sweepstake, where a winner is chosen completely at random.

To take the hard work out of running your Facebook contest, you may want to consider using a third-party app – these can keep track of entrants and even pick a winner for you. They can also help to organize any data (such as email addresses and Facebook user IDs).

There are numerous apps for such purpose available, including Rafflecopter, Votigo and WooBox.

5. Lay down the rules

Make sure you have clear and concise T&Cs for your Facebook contest.

Some important items to include are how people can enter, when the competition closes, whether there are any age or location restrictions, what the prize will be, whether people can enter more than once and how the winner will be announced.

To ensure you’re fully covered, and comply with any regional competition laws, you may want to seek professional advice.

6. Make it easy to enter and share

We’ve all clicked on a Facebook contest hoping to win a great prize, only to realize we first need to fill in endless information about ourselves.

If your prize is a two-week, all-inclusive holiday to the Bahamas, people may be willing to spend time entering all the information you require, but for the most part, try to keep the entry mechanism as short and simple as possible – otherwise people will quickly lose interest which could reduce your entries and reach.

Likewise, you should make it easy for participants to share your contest with their friends, as this will help to generate more entries for you.

7. Ensure your contest is mobile-friendly

A huge proportion of people who check Facebook are on their mobile, so to avoid missing out on their entry, you need to ensure that your contest is mobile-friendly.

If you’re using a third-party app, pick one that works on mobile devices easily and always test it from your own mobile before pushing the contest live.

8. Boost with Facebook ads

Although people may naturally come across your contest in their News Feed, organic reach may not be enough to deliver the results you’re looking for.

To help drive more visibility to your contest, try running some Facebook ads to promote it. If you need help with ads, take a look at Facebook’s guide.

9. Promote your contest beyond Facebook

You should also consider promoting your Facebook contest beyond your Facebook Page.

Start by sharing it across all your social channels. Consider whether there’s a suitable place to promote it via your website, and even in any email newsletters you send out to customers. Add it to your email signature and don’t under-estimate the power of word of mouth.

10. Measure your contest performance

Before you close the book on your contest, make sure you review its performance.

Consider whether it met your expectations, what worked well and what didn’t work so well.

Although this may seem tedious, any learnings that can be gleaned will help you to improve any Facebook contests you run in the future.

Main image via Pixabay

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Cookies To Humans: Implications Of Identity Systems On Incentives!

Cookies To Humans: Implications Of Identity Systems On Incentives!

GreenA story where data is the hero, followed by two mind-challenging business-shifting ideas.

At a previous employer customer service on the phone was a huge part of the operation. Qualitative surveys were giving the company a read that customers were unhappy with the service being provided. As bad customer service is a massive long-term cost – and short-term pain –, it was decided that the company would undertake a serious re-training effort for all the customer service reps and with that problems would get solved faster. To ensure customer delight was delivered in a timely manner, it was also decided that Average Call Time (ACT) would now be The success metric. It would even be tied to a customer service rep’s compensation creating an overlap between their personal success and the company’s success.

What do you think happened?

There is such a thing as employees that don’t really give a frek about their job or company, they just come to work. You’ll be surprised how small that number is. (Likewise, the number of employees that go well above the call of duty, look to constantly push personal and company boundaries is also quite small.) Most employees work diligently to deliver against set expectations.

Reflecting that, in our story, most customer service reps, re-trained, took the phone calls with the goal of driving down Average Call Time. They worked as quick as they could to resolve issues. But, pretty quickly customers with painful problems became a personally painful problem for an individual customer service rep. They hurt ACT, and comp. Solution? If the rep felt the call was going too long, self-preservation kicked in and they would hang up on the customer. Another issue. If towards the end of the week/month your ACT was going to look terrible on your Manager’s dashboard, calls were picked up and hung up right away.

Result?

The success metric, ACT, did go down. The qualitative surveys measuring unhappiness went down even more than before. Likelihood to repurchase, took a painful hit.

What you deem as success creates an incentive for an individual employee, the group/division, your company’s partners, to behave in a certain way. When you choose unwisely, the long-term consequences can be dramatic.

Epilogue: There were lots of reasons for the fiasco above. ACT goals were set imprecisely. Too much emphasis was on Averages (remember averages suck, distributions are better). Reporting/dashboards were terribly created (CDPs anyone?).  That ACT was an activity metric was terrible – if you have a The success metric, it should always be an outcome metric. The closed loop with customer was too slow and loopy resulting in a slower understanding of impact. And, you can’t discount a contribution the quality of leaders. Company did recover, their stock is doing fine. Now.

Humans are pavlovian. Incentives matter. Metrics matter. A Key Performance Indicator (KPI), our industry’s lingo for what becomes The metric, has massive influence.

Let me share a real-world story with you about this phenomenon, how I end up simply framing the problem above, and the solution for my clients.

An amazing blessing of my professional life is the opportunity to work with influential companies around the world. At one such recent opportunity, I wanted to communicate two simple but powerful elements.

1. You are what you measure.

Set better incentives for the org, see above life-lesson. Additionally, I passionately believe that optimal metrics help solve for more than an individual’s behavior. They help incentivize the elimination of siloed thinking amongst teams/divisions, politics, and self-serving execution that naturally creeps into every organization of every size.

If you pick the right metric, you can get people to care about the goals of their neighboring team/division. You can even get them to care about the long-term interests of the company.

2. Obsess about individual humans.

Zeroing in on digital specifically I wanted to create an north-star for brilliance to emanate through solving of tough problems over time.

My solution was two fold: Bring two lovely things into the equation: Profit & Humans!

I encouraged a ladder of awesomeness type shift from third-party cookies to first-party cookies to browser based persistent-id systems (in place today) to cross-device digital ids to a unified online and offline id (I call it nonline id) to finally a named human id pan-all-existences. Truly omg coolness.

Identity is key because currently targeting capabilities far out-strip any organization’s ability to take advantage of it. Throw in Machine Learning and I weep at how many glorious sales, marketing, deep relationships initiatives are impossible because companies have not solved identity. (You, I’m talking about you!)

It is not easy. But, it is solvable. See where you are, go up one step. Then one more, then one more. Obsess about identity.

Great ideas are nice. Being able to communicate them simply is hard. As you’ve read in the Forbes article, I love storytelling.

I attempted to communicate the complexity above in a single picture.

Here’s what came out of my doodling with crayons…

metrics-incentives

Like perhaps most large organizations, this one was a bit more focused on Cost. While not optimal, it was understandable given the evolutionary stage they were at.

I tried to incorporate their reality, and my picture starts with the metric they used to measure success and quickly moves to the right to metrics I believe are more impactful to the one on the very right that is an impossible dream at the moment (the north star).

Here are the definitions…

Cost Per Impression. An almost, if not entirely, useless metric no matter where it is applied. No one should use this for anything ever. World peace will be hastened by a millennia.

Click-Thru Rate. A little more interesting. Helps shine a light on the ability to do clever targeting, the content in the messages/ads, and smartness in bidding strategies. Good tactical wholesomeness.

Cost Per Lead. An outcome! Yes. In this case this was technically a micro-outcome in this case (conversion is offline). Still, very nice.

Cost Per Human. See the pivot? Per Human. In my definition, this is also online to offline, offline to online or whatever the heck to whatever the heck. It is very hard to do, you have to solve so many tough problems. It also has massively delicious implications in your data, acquisition and retention strategies (ignoring the sweet, heavenly, implications on your customers).

I realize that between CPL and CPH you go from crawling to flying. But, that is what north stars are all about.

Profit Per Human. What every company and non-profit really, really, really need. Why care about something as lame as cost? The only thing that matters is profit. Per. Human.

[Bonus: Remember, you can measure profit everyday in Google Analytics!]

An incredibly complex story, with implications up and down the organization, with smarter tactical and strategic choices, and a long-term hard problem to solve, all wrapped into one simple slide. When you communicate, that is all you need, after all you are the story and not the thing on the screen.

I of course built the story out piece-by-piece, when I was done, this is how it looked…

metrics-incentives-accountability

Imagine for a moment the behavior of your Acquisition team (call it Sales, call it Marketing, call it Tony), if you measure them based on CPM or CPL. Each incentivizes such a different behavior, right?

Applying it to digital advertising…

Shove ads up people’s faces like crazy, who cares if there are 300 words of content surrounded by 18 ads? CPM baby! These Marketers write articles and give conference keynotes that obsess about “viewable above-the-fold ads.” A heartbreaking obsession, but remember it is what they are being incentivized to care about.

Or, worry a ton about the three ad levers you can pull, Content, Targeting, Bids, to ensure you are optimizing for the max leads you can get. Will this marketer give two hoots about “viewable above-the-fold ads”? Only to the extent that their three levers might be influencing less clicks. Instead, they shift that problem to the ad-network (yes!). Let them ensure the ads are showing up in non-crappy-more-relevant sites/apps where the Content and Targeting results in a click to a lead. Good behavior shift.

Extend the above incentive purification and imagine the day-to-day behavior of your Acquisition team if you measure them based on CPH. Or… PPH. See, how dramatically different their execution strategy, their obsessions will be?

Can you imagine why I say team and organization and online-offline silos will be broken as you go further to the right? No one person can succeed without active collaboration, and empathy, with rest of the teams!

That’s what you want for yourself or teams that you lead. PPH.

One more thing.

Taking this out of the confines that define the reality of the client, you know that I don’t obsess about Cost this much. It tends to have other unintended consequences (especially lower down in organizations).

Hence.. Here’s an important switch to one of the five metrics to better reflect my worldview…

metrics-incentives-better-accountability

Revenue Per Human.

Subtle change. But, you want people to obsess about Revenue and not Cost. Else people do frustratingly short-sighted things. This is real, from last week: "Our 2017 goal is to reduce the cost of your display campaigns by 20%."

I wanted to die.

Who gives a small kiwi if costs are down by 20% or up by 40%? Are you making more money every day? Are you taking advantage of the complete opportunity to win in the market? Is your competition stealing share by the bucket load while you obsess about cost?

If 10xing your revenue requires that you quadruple your costs, what’s the problem?

Remember, we still have PPH to ensure that the revenue we are driving is driving a positive influence on the bottom-line of the company.

Yet, most senior executives in the world incentivize their organizations to solve for cost. Then, they are surprised that they are losing market share or a new competitor crushes them. Hey, costs are lower this year! #winning #not 

But wait, there’s more!

Since I’m now solving for all of you, one more critical evolution to bring this baby home.

If you have read anything I’ve ever written, you know that I obsess about ensuring every view I have, every portfolio of segments I have, every dashboard I create, every incentive-structure conversation I lead, every business strategy I help craft has to have the three elements that form an end-to-end view: Acquisition, Behavior, Outcomes.

In the picture above, you’ll notice I have Acquisition metrics, Outcome metrics, but no behavior metrics.

Not nice. Let’s fix that.

There are many candidates, I wanted to have something that _flows_ with the story I was trying to tell… Something that would still incentivize optimal behavior… Something a little unorthodox to push your thinking… Here’s my recommendation…

metrics-incentives-best-accountability

Cost Per (unique) Page View.

I said orthodox, did I not. 🙂

Measure what it cost you to drive every page view (unique). It gives you a sense for content consumption. It will include all the bounced sessions (pain). It will get you to dive deeper into what site/app sections people visit, what they are not reading, what they do read, how many unique page views does it take to get a Lead, what about freshness of content, anything about layout and experimentation, so on and so forth.

Not quite perfect, but an unorthodox start to demonstrate the creativity you can bring to this.

Regardless of the version of the story you use, it is important to create an end-to-end picture for your own company, your own work.

You will matter more to your company as you personally shoot for the right side of the picture. It will be simply because you are solving for a KPI that actually matters when it comes to the fundamental existence of your company.

Got PPH?

Inspiration: The Identity Spectrum, Ideal Solution.

So much of my solution for your huge success (imagine that being said as: yuge success 😉 is dependent on identity. That last bit I added above, Human, has meant many different things over the evolution of the web. There are so many different identity mechanisms out there.

To help you traverse through them, and to get you to Human as in an individual warm body, here’s the identity spectrum we have access to today…

Cookies 3rd.

Most advertising networks use third-party cookies (cookies they set inside mobile and desktop browsers on your behalf – but not as you). These cookies tend to be fragile as they are not accepted in many browsers and are more often deleted – by choice or default. In the past they were roughly equivalent to a person as we all had one computer with one browser. They are not the most primitive form of any measurement (though if you only rely on your ad-network for success metrics of any type then you don’t have a choice, you are stuck with this fragile thing, and I offer a heartfelt sorry that your world is sad).

Here’s one metric you might have heard of that relies on 3rd party cookies: View-Thru Conversions. (Cue sad music.)

What can yo do with third-party cookies? Hold yourself, your ad networks, accountable in a narrow silo.

Cookies 1st.

These are set by existences you own. You’ll recognize these most commonly as being set by Adobe or Google Analytics on your site to better track metrics like Sessions and Users. They tend to be a lot less fragile because most personalization and authorizations except this capability. There is still a decay, if you want to get a sense for it checkout the Recency reports in your analytics tool. They are terrible at identity now as we all use multiple browsers on the same machine, and of course we use laptops, desktops, tablets, and phones (sometimes all at the same time with the same digital company!). It is imperative that you get off it as soon as you can.

Pretty much every metric in your Google Analytics reports uses first-party cookies as the identity mechanism. Conversion Rate. Bounce Rate. Visits to Purchase. Pageviews Per User.

What can you do with first-party cookies? Create better experiences in individual browser (as in Chrome) silos. Leverage advertising solutions like RLSA.

Login-ID 1st.

I’m a paying subscriber to my beloved New Yorker magazine. I’m logged into it’s site on my desktop, laptop, tablet, and phone. I’m logged into the browsers and the mobile application. This empowers the people at Condé Nast to dump cookies and use any digital analytics platform to rely on my login-id as identity to stitch my experiences and truly understand my Acquisition, Behavior and Outcome touch-points.

Login-ID is not fragile (for me the site/apps won’t even work without it). For The New Yorker they can easily tie to my name, address, credit card and a more. I know Condé Nast does not  leverage any of this because none of their platforms show any level of personalization, none of their offers for upping the subscription, none of their ads I see anywhere around the web, etc. show any intelligence related to me as a person. Sad. But. At least the possibility exists, and hope that Condé Nast will wakeup one day to the deeper loyalty and delight they could create using this identity.

For most of you, Login-ID might just be an account someone created on the web or a email address that someone used to sign up for your mailing list. In these cases of Login-ID you don’t have the tie to a human like above, but it is still better than cookies! Switch to 1. using an identity system that relies on Login-ID and 2. create meaningful incentives for people to login to their account.

Cookies as an identity are now only for those who don’t care about their digital business. Login-ID (the New Yorker variety or the signed up for an account) should be default.

For the most glamorous amongst you (I of course mean all of you!), you can stitch the third-party and first-party cookies littered around for your individual Login-IDs and paint an even more robust picture. I recommend this not as the default (because it is a lot of work), but rather as something you can do when *all* other business problems have been solved.

[Bonus: Here’s how to use Universal Analytics to implement Login-ID identity on your digital existences.]

What can you do with Login-ID identity? See above New Yorker example. Summary:  Personalized experiences via intent inferred from expressed behavior. Smarter Search, Display. More interesting understanding of Profitability (it will blow what you do with default first-party cookies with Adobe/Analytics out of the water on day one!).

Login-ID 3rd.

For people who can’t do above sometimes tend to rent an identity system from a third-party. This would be you implementing the Facebook identity system on your site, or one from Google or someone else who currently has most of the internet as it’s User.

So, people can log into your website using the Facebook identity system. With it comes the reduction of the pain of getting people to signup, and also additional behavioral data that the identity platform (say Facebook) would like to share. With it also come limitations related to how much of the customer data and relationship with the customer you own, as well as how much of this can you tie to your online, offline systems.

If you simply can’t do Login-ID on your own for any reason, this is a compromise is less worse than simply relying on cookies.

identity_landscape_occams_razor

Nonline Customer-ID.

An improved variation of Login-ID 1st strategy. Most companies (think any retailer for example) still operate their identities in a silo. There is one for online (the one above), there will be another when you call on the phone (it might be your registered phone number), there will be a different one for when you walk into the store, and depending on if they own the store or if it is a channel for them, there might be one more.

Nonline Customer-ID is an identity platform that allows you to tie all of the above experiences down to one.

It could very well be my phone number. If I’m on your website, mobile app, call your phone center, walk into your store, or anything else, you use my phone number to know it is an individual. In this case, you come very, very close to Human.

Soon it could also be a BLE device implanted in my body that, in close quarters only, allows you to identify me when I am on your site (using a reader on my laptop), in your app (reader on the phone), in your store (readers in your ceilings) and so on and so forth.

It could be other things. I’m not opining on the pros and cons of doing this, I’m leaving out how you feel about this. That is for governments, companies and you to decide.

What can you do with Nonline Customer-ID identity? The ultimate deep level of understanding of customer behavior (as in customer), effectiveness of your marketing and service strategies, profitability, and everything else. If you want to imagine how insightful this can be, close your eyes, think of your business, imagine you have a Nonline Customer-ID platform, think of your current marketing data-driven attribution report. You realize how much this current holy grail sucks, right? That’s what I mean. Times 1000.

Nonline Customer-Id is an identity system will finally allow you to behave as one company and understand one person. B2B. B2C. A2P. DJT.

Nonline Customer-Name-ID.

This won’t apply to all companies, but as I’m deeply passionate about delighting every single individual human I wanted to share this purer version of Nonline Customer-ID.

Let’s take the most famous example: Amazon.

Today, Amazon is as close to Nonline Customer-ID as an identity system as you can get. Every touch point from site experience to mobile app to chat to phone (yes, they have that!) etc. play off the same identity.

But, in my family, like perhaps yours, my spouse and I both use the same identity (and both buy and ship things under my name to our home).

Amazon does not understand us individually though. From the recommendations it gives us to greeting her with my name everywhere, it is stuck with just Nonline Customer-ID identity.

But. Amazon has cookies. It has access to device-ids for mobile. It has access to pages viewed. It has access to products shopped from various browser IDs. And more.

They can easily use two or more of those to assign a Nonline Customer-Name-ID to my wife and to me. In one amazing instant, it would understand us individually and be able uniquely deliver deeper personalization, offers, support, and more.

It won’t be perfect. Perhaps it is off by 5%. But, it would be exponentially better than what exists today (which honestly is already better than 90% of the companies on the planet). And, Amazon needs it’s customers to do nothing new.

Additionally, Amazon could understand Home and understand Avinash and Jennie. Imagine all the possibilities that that unlocks.

What can Nonline Customer-Name-ID do for you? Cross-device intent customized smarter experiences that power relationships and not just shopping. Nirvana.

Now you know what it takes to truly get to Human. To real PPH. The only metric that matters (even for a non-profit). And, we’re not just talking about digital.

Got Human?

As always, it is your turn now.

Considering our metrics incentive spectrum pictures above, where is your company in terms of incentives for it’s employees? Are your little team, or your giant division, solving for the global maxima? If you are a leader, what incentives have you created for people who work for you? What element represents your company’s current identity system? What roadblocks do you see in front of you to get to Nonline Customer-Name-ID?

Please share your ideas, struggles, criticism of my ideas, worries and joy via comments below. I’ll be most grateful for the conversation.

Thank you.

Cookies To Humans: Implications Of Identity Systems On Incentives! is a post from: Occam’s Razor by Avinash Kaushik

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Closing down for a day

Closing down for a day

Even in today’s "always-on" world, sometimes businesses want to take a break. There are times when even their online presence needs to be paused. This blog post covers some of the available options so that a site’s search presence isn’t affected.

Option: Block cart functionality

If a site only needs to block users from buying things, the simplest approach is to disable that specific functionality. In most cases, shopping cart pages can either be blocked from crawling through the robots.txt file, or blocked from indexing with a robots meta tag. Since search engines either won’t see or index that content, you can communicate this to users in an appropriate way. For example, you may disable the link to the cart, add a relevant message, or display an informational page instead of the cart.

Option: Always show interstitial or pop-up

If you need to block the whole site from users, be it with a "temporarily unavailable" message, informational page, or popup, the server should return a 503 HTTP result code ("Service Unavailable"). The 503 result code makes sure that Google doesn’t index the temporary content that’s shown to users. Without the 503 result code, the interstitial would be indexed as your website’s content.

Googlebot will retry pages that return 503 for up to about a week, before treating it as a permanent error that can result in those pages being dropped from the search results. You can also include a "Retry after" header to indicate how long the site will be unavailable. Blocking a site for longer than a week can have negative effects on the site’s search results regardless of the method that you use.

Option: Switch whole website off

Turning the server off completely is another option. You might also do this if you’re physically moving your server to a different data center. For this, have a temporary server available to serve a 503 HTTP result code for all URLs (with an appropriate informational page for users), and switch your DNS to point to that server during that time.

  1. Set your DNS TTL to a low time (such as 5 minutes) a few days in advance.
  2. Change the DNS to the temporary server’s IP address.
  3. Take your main server offline once all requests go to the temporary server.
  4. … your server is now offline …
  5. When ready, bring your main server online again.
  6. Switch DNS back to the main server’s IP address.
  7. Change the DNS TTL back to normal.

We hope these options cover the common situations where you’d need to disable your website temporarily. If you have any questions, feel free to drop by our webmaster help forums!

PS If your business is active locally, make sure to reflect these closures in the opening hours for your local listings too!

Posted by John Mueller, Webmaster Trends Analyst, Switzerland

via Google Webmaster Central Blog Read More…

Closing down for a day

Closing down for a day

Even in today’s "always-on" world, sometimes businesses want to take a break. There are times when even their online presence needs to be paused. This blog post covers some of the available options so that a site’s search presence isn’t affected.

Option: Block cart functionality

If a site only needs to block users from buying things, the simplest approach is to disable that specific functionality. In most cases, shopping cart pages can either be blocked from crawling through the robots.txt file, or blocked from indexing with a robots meta tag. Since search engines either won’t see or index that content, you can communicate this to users in an appropriate way. For example, you may disable the link to the cart, add a relevant message, or display an informational page instead of the cart.

Option: Always show interstitial or pop-up

If you need to block the whole site from users, be it with a "temporarily unavailable" message, informational page, or popup, the server should return a 503 HTTP result code ("Service Unavailable"). The 503 result code makes sure that Google doesn’t index the temporary content that’s shown to users. Without the 503 result code, the interstitial would be indexed as your website’s content.

Googlebot will retry pages that return 503 for up to about a week, before treating it as a permanent error that can result in those pages being dropped from the search results. You can also include a "Retry after" header to indicate how long the site will be unavailable. Blocking a site for longer than a week can have negative effects on the site’s search results regardless of the method that you use.

Option: Switch whole website off

Turning the server off completely is another option. You might also do this if you’re physically moving your server to a different data center. For this, have a temporary server available to serve a 503 HTTP result code for all URLs (with an appropriate informational page for users), and switch your DNS to point to that server during that time.

  1. Set your DNS TTL to a low time (such as 5 minutes) a few days in advance.
  2. Change the DNS to the temporary server’s IP address.
  3. Take your main server offline once all requests go to the temporary server.
  4. … your server is now offline …
  5. When ready, bring your main server online again.
  6. Switch DNS back to the main server’s IP address.
  7. Change the DNS TTL back to normal.

We hope these options cover the common situations where you’d need to disable your website temporarily. If you have any questions, feel free to drop by our webmaster help forums!

PS If your business is active locally, make sure to reflect these closures in the opening hours for your local listings too!

Posted by John Mueller, Webmaster Trends Analyst, Switzerland

via Google Webmaster Central Blog Read More…

New in SEOprofiler: the very best SEO website audit tool that you can get

New in SEOprofiler: the very best SEO website audit tool that you can get
Based on your feedback, and on our long experience as search engine optimization tool developers, we have created a brand new Website Audit tool that will help you to improve your web pages quickly and easily. The new version has been rewritten from scratch. It offers many new features and improvements that enable you to work even more efficiently than before.

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How to Create Content That Keeps Earning Links (Even After You Stop Promoting It)

How to Create Content That Keeps Earning Links (Even After You Stop Promoting It)

Posted by kerryjones

Do your link building results look something like this?

  1. Start doing outreach
  2. Get links
  3. Stop doing outreach
  4. No more links

Everyone talks about the long-term benefits of using content marketing as part of a link building strategy. But without the right type of content, your experience may be that you stop earning links as soon as you stop doing outreach.

In this sense, you have to keep putting gas in the car for it to keep running (marketing “gas” = time, effort, and resources). But what if there was a way to fill up the car once, and that would give it enough momentum to run for months or even years?

An example of this is a salary negotiations survey we published last year on Harvard Business Review. The study was picked up by TechCrunch months after we had finished actively promoting it. We didn’t reach out to TechCrunch. Rather, this writer presumably stumbled upon our content while doing research for his article.

techcrunch-link.png

So what’s the key to long-term links? Content that acts as a source.

The goal is to create something that people will find and link to when they’re in need of sources to cite in content they are creating. Writers constantly seek out sources that will back up their claims, strengthen an argument, or provide further context for readers. If your content can serve as a citation, you can be in a good position to earn a lot of passive links.

Read on for information about which content types are most likely to satisfy people in need of sources and tips on how to execute these content types yourself.

Original research and new data

Content featuring new research can be extremely powerful for building authoritative links via a PR outreach strategy.

A lot of the content we create for our clients falls under this category, but not every single link that our client campaigns earn are directly a result of us doing outreach.

In many cases, a large number of links to our client research campaigns earn come from what we call syndication. This is what typically plays out when we get a client’s campaign featured on a popular, authoritative site (which is Site A in the following scenario):

  • Send content pitch to Site A.
  • Site A publishes article linking to content.
  • Site B sees content featured on Site A. Site B publishes article linking to content.
  • Site C sees content featured on Site A. Site C publishes article linking to content.
  • And so on…

So, what does this have to do with long-term link earning? Once the content is strategically seeded on relevant sites using outreach and syndication, it is well-positioned to be found by other publishers.

Site A’s content functions as the perfect citation for these additional publishers because it’s the original source of the newsworthy information, establishing it as the authority and thus making it more likely to be linked to. (This is what happened in the TechCrunch example I shared above.)

Examples

In a recent Experts on the Wire podcast, guest Andy Crestodina talked about the “missing stat.” According to Andy, most industries have “commonly asserted, but rarely supported” statements. These “stats” are begging for someone to conduct research that will confirm or debunk them. (Side note: this particular podcast episode inspired this post – definitely worth a listen!)

To find examples of content that uncovers a missing stat in the wild, we can look right here on the Moz blog…

Confirming industry assumptions

When we did our native advertising versus content marketing study, we went into it with a hypothesis that many fellow marketers would agree with: Content marketing campaigns perform better than native advertising campaigns.

This was a missing stat; there hadn’t been any studies done proving or debunking this assumption. Furthermore, there wasn’t any publicly available data about the average number of links acquired for content marketing campaigns. This was a concrete data point a lot of marketers (including us!) wanted to know since it would serve as a performance benchmark.

Screen Shot 2017-02-27 at 1.16.47 PM.png

As part of the study, we surveyed 30 content marketing agencies about how many links the average content marketing campaign earned, in addition to other questions related to pricing, client KPIs, and more.

After the research was published here on Moz, we did some promotion to get our data featured on Harvard Business Review, Inc, and Marketing Land. This data is still being linked to and shared today without us actively promoting it, such as this mention on SEMRush’s blog and this mention on the Scoop It blog (pictured below).

scoop-it-citation.png

To date, it’s been featured on more than 80 root domains and earned dozens of co-citations. It’s worth noting that this has been about far more than acquiring high-quality links; this research has been extremely effective for driving new business to our agency, which it continues to do to this day.

Debunking industry assumptions

But research doesn’t always confirm presumptions. For example, Buzzsumo and Moz’s research collaboration examined a million online articles. A key finding of their research: There was no overall correlation between sharing and linking. This debunked a commonly held assumption among marketers that content that gets a lot of shares will earn a lot of links, and vice versa. To date, this post has received an impressive 403 links from 190 root domains (RDs) according to Open Site Explorer.

How to use this strategy

To find original research ideas, look at how many backlinks the top results have gotten for terms like:

  • [Industry topic] report
  • [Industry topic] study
  • [Industry topic] research

Then, using the MozBar, evaluate what you see in the top SERPs:

  • Have the top results gotten a sizable number of backlinks? (This tells you if this type of research has potential to attract links.)
  • Is the top-ranking content outdated? Can you provide new information? (Try Rand’s tips on leveraging keywords + year.)
  • Is there a subtopic you could explore?

Additionally, seeing what has already succeeded will allow you to determine two very important things: what can be updated and what can be improved upon. This is a great place to launch a brainstorm session for new data acquisition ideas.

Industry trend and benchmark reports

Sure, this content type overlaps with “New Research and Studies,” but it merits its own section because of its specificity and high potential.

If your vertical experiences significant change from one year, quarter, or month to the next, there may be an opportunity to create recurring reports that analyze the state of your industry. This is a great opportunity to engage all different kinds of brands within your industry while also showcasing your authority in the subject.

How?

People often like to take trends and add their own commentary as to why trends are occurring or how to make the most of a new, popular strategy. That means they’ll often link to your report to provide the context.

And there’s an added promotional benefit: Once you begin regularly publishing and promoting this type of content, your industry will anticipate future releases.

Examples

HubSpot’s State of Inbound report, which features survey data from thousands of HubSpot customers, has been published annually for the last eight years. To date, the URL that hosts the report has links from 495 RDs.

Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs have teamed up for the last seven years to release two annual content marketing benchmark reports. The most recent report on B2B content marketing has earned links from 130 RDs. To gather the data, CMI and MarketingProfs emailed a survey to a sample of marketers from their own email marketing lists as well as a few lists from partner companies.

In addition to static reports, you can take this a step further and create something dynamic that is continually updated, like Indeed’s Job Trends Search (171 RDs) which pulls from their internal job listing data.

How to use this strategy

Where can you find fresh industry data? Here are a few suggestions:

Survey your customers/clients

You have a whole pool of people who have been involved in your industry, so why not ask them some questions to learn more about their thoughts, needs, fears, and experiences?

Talking directly to customers and clients is a great way to cut through speculation and discover exactly what problems they’re facing and the solutions they’re seeking.

Survey your industry

There are most likely companies in your industry that aren’t direct competitors but have a wealth of insight to provide to the overall niche.

For example, we at Fractl surveyed 1,300 publishers because we wanted to learn more about what they were looking for in content pitches. This knowledge is valuable to any content marketers involved in content promotions (including ourselves!).

Ask yourself: What aspect of your industry might need some more clarification, and who can you reach out to for more information?

Use your internal company data

This is often the easiest and most effective option. You probably have a ton of interesting data based on your interactions with customers and clients that would benefit fellow professionals in your industry.

Think about these internal data sets you have and consider how you can break it down to reveal trends in your niche while also providing actionable insights to readers.

Curated resources

Research can be one of the most time-consuming aspects of creating content. If someone has pulled together a substantial amount of information on the topic in one place, it can save anyone else writing about it a lot of time.

If you’re willing to put in the work of digging up data and examples, curated resource content may be your key to evergreen link building. Let’s look at a few common applications of this style of content.

Examples

Collections of statistics and facts

Don’t have the means to conduct your own research? Combining insightful data points from credible sources into one massive resource is also effective for long-term link attraction, especially if you keep updating your list with fresh data.

HubSpot’s marketing statistics list has attracted links from 963 root domains. For someone looking for data points to cite, a list like this can be a gold mine. This comprehensive data collection features their original data plus data from external sources. It’s regularly updated with new data, and there’s even a call-to-action at the end of the list to submit new stats.

Your list doesn’t need to be as broad as the HubSpot example, which covers a wide range of marketing topics. A curated list around a more granular topic can work, too, such as this page filled with mobile email statistics (550 RDs).

Concrete examples

Good writers help readers visualize what they’re writing about. To do this, you need to show concrete evidence of abstract ideas. As my 7th grade English teacher used to tell us: show, don’t tell.

By grouping a bunch of relevant examples in a single resource, you can save someone a lot of time when they’re in need of examples to illustrate the points they make in their writing. I can write thousands of words about the idea of 10x content, but without showing examples of what it looks like in action, you’re probably going to have a hard time understanding it. Similarly, the bulk of time it took me to create this post was spent finding concrete examples of the types of content I refer to.

The resource below showcases 50 examples of responsive design. Simple in its execution, the content features screenshots of each responsive website and a descriptive paragraph or two. It’s earned links from 184 RDs.

Authority Nutrition’s list of 20 high-protein foods has links from 53 RDs. If I’m writing a nutrition article where I mention high-protein foods, linking to this page will save me from researching and listing out a handful of protein-rich foods.

How to use this strategy

The first step is to determine what kind of information would be valuable to have all in one place for other professionals in your industry to access.

Often times, it’s the same information that would be valuable for you.

Here are some ways to brainstorm:

  • Explore your recent blog posts or other on-site content. What needed a lot of explaining? What topics did you wish you had more examples to link to? Take careful note of your own content needs while tackling your own work.
  • Examine comments on other industry articles and resources. What are people asking for? This is a gold mine for the needs of potential customers. You can take a similar approach on Reddit and Quora.
  • What works for other industries that you can apply to your own? Search for terms like the following to see what has been successful for other niches that you can apply to yours:
    • [Industry topic] examples
    • types of [industry topic]
    • list of [Industry topic]
    • [Industry topic] statistics OR stats
    • [Industry topic] facts

No matter which way you choose to proceed, the time investment can help you garner many links down the line.

Beginner content

Every niche has a learning curve, with various words, concepts, and ideas being foreign to a beginner.

Content that teaches noobs the ins and outs of your vertical has long-term linking potential. This type of content is popular for citations because it saves the writer from explaining things in their own words. Instead, they can link to the expert’s explanation.

And the best part is you can tap your internal experts to provide great insights that can serve as the foundation for this type of content.

Examples

101 Content

Moz’s Beginner’s Guide to SEO is a master class in how comprehensive beginner-level content becomes a link magnet. Not only does the guide have backlinks from more than 1,700 RDs, it also edges out the home page as the most-trafficked page on the site, according to SEMrush.

“What is…?”

Beginner content need not be as massive and thorough as the Moz guide to be linkable. It can be as simple as defining an industry term or concept.

Moz’s meta description page, which has backlinks from 244 RDs, is a solid example of an authoritative yet simple answer to a “what is?” query.

Another example is the first result in Google for the query “what is the Paleo diet,” which has 731 links from 228 RDs. It’s not a 10,000-word academic paper about the paleo diet. Rather, it’s a concise answer to the question. This page has served as an excellent source for anyone writing about the Paleo diet within the last several years.

screenshot-robbwolf.com 2017-02-21 14-17-01.png

If a lot of adequate top-level, definition-style content already exists about topics related to your vertical, consider creating content around emerging terms and concepts that aren’t yet widely understood, but may soon be more mainstream.

The perfect example of this? Creating a definitive explanation about content marketing before the entire world knew what content marketing meant. Case in point: Content Marketing Institute’s “What is Content Marketing?” page has amassed an impressive from 12,462 links from 1,100 root domains.

How to use this strategy

Buzzsumo recently released a new tool called Bloomberry which scours forums including Reddit and Quora for questions being asked about a keyword. You can search by time period (ex. questions asked within the last 6 months, all-time results, etc.) and filter by source (ex. only see questions asked in Reddit).

Use Bloomberry to see what beginner questions are being asked about your keyword/topic. Keyword ideas include:

  • [Industry topic] definition
  • How does [industry topic] work
  • [Industry topic] guide
  • What is [industry topic]

After doing the search, ask yourself:

  • What questions keep coming up?
  • How are these common questions being answered?

Bloomberry is also useful for spotting research opportunities. Within the first few results for “SaaS” I found three potential research ideas.

bloomberry.png

Pro tip: Return to these threads and provide an answer plus link to your content once it’s published.

Yes, you still need to promote your content

Don’t mistake this post as a call to stop actively doing outreach and promotion to earn links. Content promotion should serve as the push that gives your content the momentum to continue earning links. After you put in the hard work of getting your content featured on reputable sites with sizable audiences, you have strong potential to organically attract more links. And the more links your content has, the easier it will be for writers and publishers in need of sources to find it.

What types of content do you think are best for earning citation links? I’d love to hear what’s worked for you – please share your experiences in the comments below.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

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353 – Burleigh Brewing’s Business Strategy Is All About Delivering Awesomeness

353 – Burleigh Brewing’s Business Strategy Is All About Delivering Awesomeness

Heard the one about the lawyer who walked into a bar? This isn’t just any bar either. The iconic Burleigh Brewing Co was started by Peta Fielding and her husband Brennan on the back of successful brewing endeavours in Hawaii.

Peta said that she always knew she wanted to create a special business, she didn’t know what, but she knew what it would feel like. After meeting her would be husband, a talented brewer in Hawaii the pieces started to fall into place.


Great #marketing insights from the award-winning @burleighbrewing
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Listen in as we cover some serious marketing ground including:

  • How Peta went from high flying lawyer to an MBA in Hawaii to owning a brewery and pub in Hawaii to Starting The Burleigh Brewing Company
  • How every beer has a story (and a cool name to go with it – like My Wife’s Bitter!)
  • Burleigh Brewing Company’s philosophy around people
  • The importance of community and how it intersects with local marketing initiatives

We make AWESOME the new standard @burleighbrewing
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But that’s not all. In this episode of your favourite marketing podcast:


I love @TimboReid ‘s The Small Business Big Marketing Show
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Yep, you guessed it, another big episode, so let’s get stuck, right in.

 

 


 

EPISODE TIMELINE

 

00:00  Two Marketing Insights
00:51  Teaser
01:30  Welcome & overview
02:45  Insights into The Small Business Outsourcing Tour to the Philippines
03:44  Today’s guest introduction – Peta Fielding
05:08  Interview with Peta Fielding
40:00  Insights into Cornerstone Business Solutions
41:40  Insights into Key Person of Influence and The Small Business Big Marketing Club
44:59 My Top 3 Attention Grabbers from my chat with Peta Fielding
46:10  How to run a weird marketing campaign to grow your business
48:57 Wrap-up and an insight in to both a past guest & next week’s guest

 


 

MY TOP 3 MARKETING ATTENTION GRABBERS

 

  1. Spend the time to make your brand pop. Head over to BurleighBrewing.com.au and check out how Peta has done it with their brands.
  2. Story-telling makes brand development simple. Take a listen to my interview with Dave Musson of Saddleback Leather.
  3. Celebrate staff anniversaries. Success in small business is celebrating the big wins and the little wins.

 


 

RESOURCES & LINKS MENTIONED

 

Burleigh Brewing Company’s official website

Get access to the 9 steps involved in creating highly profitable partnerships from Key Person of Influence’s Glen Carlson inside The Small Business Big Marketing Club

What Have You Got To Lose – How to run a weird marketing campaign to grow your business

 

 


 

EPISODE SPONSORS

 

Cornerstone Business Solutions
Reduce your business running cost by up to 90%

Key Person of Influence – Become highly valued & highly paid
Grab a FREE hard or audio copy of their Amazon best-seller.

 

 


 

OVER TO YOU …

 

What was your biggest marketing learning or ah-ha moment from this episode?

Leave your comment below.

My guest and I respond to each and every comment.

 

 

The post 353 – Burleigh Brewing’s Business Strategy Is All About Delivering Awesomeness appeared first on Small Business Big Marketing.

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How 5 eCommerce Brands Created Major Profit With Small Pivots

How 5 eCommerce Brands Created Major Profit With Small Pivots

How 5 eCommerce Brands Created Major Profit With Small Pivots

Sometimes, a pivot is all you need.

In business, the stubborn among us wither and die, while those willing to adapt and change see the greatest success.

Ecommerce is no different. In fact, the pivot – changing your approach or perspective – is even more crucial because of the changing nature of the medium itself.

It’s no secret that ecommerce is big, big business, and only showing signs of getting larger. How big? Industry watchdogs predict that worldwide B2C ecommerce sales will hit just over $1.92 trillion in 2016. It seems the sky’s the limit.

But that’s in a perfect world. Sometimes, you need to think bigger. Sometimes, you need to change it up a little… or a lot.

Sometimes, you need to pivot to succeed.

Check out these five brands that have pivoted their way to major profits.

1. Brandy Melville

Despite sounding like the most American of American monikers, clothing retailer Brandy Melville was actually started over twenty years ago in Italy by Silvio Marsan and his son Stefan. The first US store didn’t appear until 2009.

Since then, they’ve opened a handful of physical stores in the United States and Canada, but remain largely an eCommerce entity to the tune of (an estimated) $125 million in 2015, and annual growth between 20-25%.

brandy-melville-for-ecommerce-profit

The Pivot: Eschewing Traditional Marketing and Development

Despite that success, you’re unlikely to see any Brandy Melville ads, and you’ve probably never even heard of them unless you’re a teenage girl. And that’s just how the company wants it.

Entering the lucrative American marketplace, they didn’t spend millions on billboards, TV spots, or celebrity endorsements. They opted instead to leverage the power of social media to build a huge teen following using pro models, customers, and employees on its feeds. For their efforts, they were christened the “first Instagram retail success” by Bloomberg in 2014, and are today a top ten teen clothing brand.

Teen centric, with a controversial “one size fits most” approach, their target audience – teen girls – don’t seem to mind their unconventional approach, and the brand actually relies on a product and development team made up largely of teenage girls… about 20 of them research and select new styles

Their brilliant instagram account (3.7 million followers) is definitely one to emulate.

Don’t be afraid to be be different than everyone else. Just because something hasn’t been tried (yet), doesn’t mean it won’t work.

2. Man Crates

At the other end of the spectrum we find Man Crates, which is exactly what you’d think it is based on their name: crates of stuff for men.

Their gift boxes for men, both generic and custom, range from eating to drinking, grilling to outdoors, and sports.

You can even personalize products with names and designs. And that’s where they ran into trouble: the personalization option became increasingly popular, and combined with their fast shipping guarantee, they quickly found themselves having difficulty (they actually had to stop sales during the Christmas rush in 2013 because of the backorder). At that time, they had been outsourcing their laser engraving to a local business and renting time on their machines each day. But they couldn’t keep up.

man-crates-for-ecommerce-profit

The Pivot: From Outsource to In-house

Rather than scrap the personalization options, they went the other way and decided to innovate and pivot. The fix? They evolved from simply boxing third-party goods to include their own manufacturing element and bought 16 laser engravers with a custom-built ventilation and electric grid, and a brilliant new queue system to allow for 35-36 orders per hour per machine… and all right on-site. Goodbye bottleneck and frustration.

The result? 20-25% of their business is currently customized orders (and growing), they’ve seen 4000% growth in four years, $21 million in revenue, and were named the 4th fastest growing retailer in the US according to 2016 Inc. 5000.

Rethinking your workflow and production methods may seem expensive and frustrating, but if you don’t adapt to fit the needs of your customers, you’re dead in the water.

3. Orabrush

You know to brush and floss twice daily. But what are your thoughts on tongue cleaners? Orabrush was hoping you’d be firmly on the “yay” side when they launched. When up to 90% of the bacteria that causes bad breath resides on your tongue, how hard could it be to convince people they need a tongue scraper?

Turns out, very hard. After years of just scraping by (no pun intended) that included an infomercial that cost tens of thousands of dollars to produce and resulted in only about 100 new orders, they had a bit of a breakthrough courtesy of YouTube.

orabrush-for-ecommerce-profit

The Pivot: Content Over Budget

You don’t have to spend $40,000 on an infomercial, or $5000 on a full-page ad. Orabrush pivoted from that antiquated thinking and created a low budget video called “The Bad Breath Test” which has since been viewed over 26 million times, and their popular YouTube channel has over 180,000 subscribers, a “Diary of a Dirty Tongue” series starring Morgan the Orabrush tongue, and sales in excess of one million orders.

One fun, innovative idea is better than one enormous budget any day of the week. Consumers respond to useful, interesting, out-of-the-box marketing more than they do the usual stuff (just look at the infamous Dollar Shave Club video for more proof).

And that’s easier than ever to do online… all you need is a digital camera and a YouTube account.

4. Everlane

Everlane, the online clothing retailer founded in 2010, has a simple motto that resonates with their customers: Modern Basics. Radical transparency.

Online clothing retailers are a dime a dozen. Want to stand out? You need to pivot away from the masses and be radically different…somehow.

everlane-for-ecommerce-profit

The Pivot: Unparalleled Transparency

60% of survey respondents said buying from “socially-responsible companies” was important to them, and 30% said they plan to increase the amount they spend on goods and services from those companies.

Everlane saw the writing on the wall and opted for total and complete transparency on pricing, production, and everything in between. They offer product breakdowns so the customer sees exactly how much it costs them to produce items, seek out and provide virtual visits to environmentally and socially responsible factories, and host a popular “Transparency Tuesday” Q&A on Snapchat each week when customers and fans can ask any question they want.

Since going transparent, Everlane has over 350,000 customers, revenue of $12 million in 2013, around $24 million in 2014, and an estimated $35 million in 2015.

When you connect on a genuine level and are completely honest and open, growth is sure to follow.

5. Nasty Gal

Started as an eBay store selling vintage clothing in 2006, founder Sophia Amoruso has guided her company to fantastic growth and profit. Nasty Gal is now one of the premier ecommerce clothing portals.

In the beginning, Amoruso went on vintage clothing treks herself, and with a keen eye and strong fashion sense, she was able to identify and procur items her customers wanted. Her eBay store was profitable, and she considered her endeavour a roaring success.

And then eBay suspended her account in 2008.

nasty-gal-for-ecommerce-profit

The Pivot: Embrace the Change

Amoruso could have happily continued selling vintage clothes on eBay if the platform hadn’t forced her hand. Instead, she moved to her own domain – nastygalvintage.com – and sold out her entire inventory on the first day.

This marked another pivot for the brand, as Amoruso understood her growing popularity meant she could no longer meet demand with just vintage finds. So, she started selling a few select new items from some of her favorite brands, and even branched out into original designs starting in 2012.

Nasty Gal passed $300 million in revenue in 2015 (and received the highest performance score of all eCommerce portals that year, beating out Apple, Amazon, Macy’s, and everyone else), a threefold increase since hitting $100 million for the first time in 2012.

Fantastic growth (92.4% compounded annual growth rate over five years), rabid fans, a healthy social media presence (19.9% of its web traffic comes from social media platforms), and a fierce, confident persona that appeals to the “awesome girl” that is its target.

The eBay suspension could have been the end of Nasty Gal, but it marked the start of its meteoric rise to eCommerce superstardom because Amoruso was willing to pivot and embrace the changes thrust upon her. She recognized when to change her direction (vintage used to select new items to original designs), and she was willing to go with the flow. Her results speak for themselves.

Wrapping it up

No matter how good your product, no matter how detailed your business plan, into everyone’s life a little challenge will fall. The stubborn refuse to budge from their original thinking.

The wise pivot and succeed.

What other pivot-to-riches stories have you heard? Have you had to pivot yourself? Leave your comments below:

Guest Author: Mo Harake

The post How 5 eCommerce Brands Created Major Profit With Small Pivots appeared first on Jeffbullas’s Blog.

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Instagram Wants To Eat Snapchat, BlackBerry Has Zero Percent Of The Mobile Market And More On This Week’s CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Instagram Wants To Eat Snapchat, BlackBerry Has Zero Percent Of The Mobile Market And More On This Week's CTRL ALT Delete Segment On CHOM 97.7 FM

Every Monday morning at 7:10 am, I am a guest contributor on CHOM 97.7 FM radio out of Montreal (home base). It’s not a long segment – about 5 to 10 minutes every week – about everything that is happening in the world of technology and digital media. The good folks at CHOM 97.7 FM are posting these segments weekly on iHeart Radio, if you’re interested in hearing more of me blathering away about what’s going on in the digital world. I’m really excited about this opportunity, because this is the radio station that I grew up on listening to, and it really is a fun treat to be invited to the Mornings Rock with Terry DiMonte morning show. The segment is called, CTRL ALT Delete with Mitch Joel.

This week we discussed: 

  • This week, Pierre Landry sits in for Terry Dimonte.
  • Instagram (owned by Facebook) wants to make sure that Snapchat doesn’t eat its lunch. So, last week they introduced new functionality that allows users to select up to 10 photos or videos for one post. You can edit each item before uploading (adding filters, tagging friends, etc…). Users can also move around the order of the images or videos before posting. You’ll now notice a blue dot on post with a number in it, which indicates how many images/videos are a part of it. 
  • Remember BlackBerry? Gartner (the large research firm) released their report last Wednesday on the state of the smartphone market. BlackBerry’s share of the global smartphone market is now official 0%. Staggering.  With that, the company just launched their latest device called KeyOne that is being manufactured by a company called TLC. The device is essentially an Android device, loaded with BlackBerry security and software designed by TCL to appeal to both those who want a touchscreen and a keyboard. Will this be enough to bring BlackBerry back?   
  • If you’re looking for work, it’s no longer just a LinkedIn and Monster world. Last week, Facebook started allowing businesses in Canada and the US to post job openings on their pages. Facebook also launched a jobs bookmark. Now, brands will be able to track applications and even communicate directly with them on Facebook and Messenger. Look out, LinkedIn! 
  • App of the week: Feedly.

Take a listen right here

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